logo

Sleep Apnea – It takes Your Breath Away

logo

If you sleep like a baby, you’ll get a fantastic night’s sleep. A restful and satisfying night’s sleep is a rare occurrence. There is no movement when you lie in bed in a deep sleep; your heart rate and blood pressure both fall and stabilise, and the electrical activity in your brain slows down. What is this elusive condition that can make us feel vital, imaginative, competent, and calm, and whose absence can make us slur and stumble, fly into states of emotional instability, and make simple mistakes with potentially catastrophic consequences? It’s remarkable that so little resources are dedicated to understanding the essence of sleep, given its universal relevance to psychosocial behaviour, our ability to learn and solve problems, and every aspect of our physiological well-being. Learn more about Snoring.

Sleep Apnea isn’t just another type of snoring. Apnea is a concept that describes repeated episodes of inability to breathe while sleeping. It comes from the Greek word apnoia, which means “without oxygen.” Snoring, awakenings accompanied by gasping for air, and severe daytime fatigue are all symptoms. If someone in your bedroom complains about your snoring, gasping, or thrashing around in your sleep, you can not even know you have these symptoms. Your daytime drowsiness could have gotten worse without you even realising it. It is not necessary to have one or more of these symptoms to have sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by a blockage in the upper airway, while central sleep apnea is caused by the brain failing to initiate breathing during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea are combined in mixed apnea.

A sleep clinic is needed to diagnose sleep apnea. Sleep Apnea is a serious sleep disorder in which people are found to have more than five to ten sleep apnea episodes every hour, each lasting more than twenty seconds. This condition puts you at risk for other diseases like hypertension, heart failure, and stroke, and it needs to be treated by a doctor. Do not take sleeping pills or sedatives if you have sleep apnea. These chemicals will cause the tissue in the upper airway to relax, worsening the obstruction. Surgery, weight loss, dental implants, and the use of airway pressure machines such as CPAP and BPAP are all options for treating apnea. These devices force air into your nose while holding your airway open. Untreated sleep apneas may have serious long-term consequences.

logo