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Knee Pain: What Causes It and How to Treat It

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Knee pain is very common, affecting one out of every four adults and one out of every three women at some point in their lives. Depending on the type of knee problem, there are a variety of causes. Ligament damage (medial and lateral collateral ligaments), anterior or posterior cruciate ligament damage, coronary ligament, and internal menisco-femoral ligament damage are all common knee problems.
Cartilage problems in the knee can result in medial or lateral Menisci tears, hyaline cartilage damage, fibro cartilage damage, and articular cartilage damage, among other issues. Do you want to learn more? Visit Regenerative Medicine.
Capsular tears, tendon damage, bursitis, anterior pain, patellofemoral pain, fat pad damage, and retuniculum damage are some of the other knee issues. Each of these issues has its own set of symptoms, and only a thorough review by a knee specialist will be able to pinpoint the issue. Many knee injuries are not resolved easily due to misdiagnosis, which is why it is important to see a knee specialist.
Trauma, degenerative tears, arthritic tears, biomechanical causes (i.e., knee misalignment), foot and back misalignments, overuse, underuse, postural and sports injuries are only a few examples of common causes of pain. Knee problems can affect anyone, ranging in age from 13 to 80 years old. The majority of the time, discomfort is caused by a variety of situations involving lifestyle balance, rather than a particular sports injury.
Anterior knee pain is more common in women. This is due to the fact that women’s pelvises are significantly wider than men’s, and as a result, the pull on the kneecap is slightly more angled than in men’s pelvises. This abnormal pull, combined with their lax joints (again, more common in men than in women), can cause anterior or patellofemoral knee pain. Early detection is critical, as evidence suggests that if anterior pain develops and is treated poorly, surgery is the most likely outcome.

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